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Showing 561 posts tagged history

Joan Mondale and Artist Georgia O’Keeffe, 1977 (by John Duricka/AP)
Joan Mondale established herself as one of the country’s most passionate advocates for the arts during the years her husband, Walter Mondale, served U.S. vice president. “Joan of Art” died Monday at the age of 83.
Photo via New York Daily News High-res

Joan Mondale and Artist Georgia O’Keeffe, 1977 (by John Duricka/AP)
Joan Mondale established herself as one of the country’s most passionate advocates for the arts during the years her husband, Walter Mondale, served U.S. vice president. “Joan of Art” died Monday at the age of 83.
Photo via New York Daily News

Pete Seeger, Minneapolis, 1972, and Thank You Note to a Young Alan Freed

In early October 1972, folk music icon Pete Seeger came to the Twin Cities for a performance at Northrop Auditorium on the University of Minnesota campus. While he was here, he stayed with friends at their home on South Cedar Lake Road. At some point during his stay, a neighbor kid named Alan Freed showed up at the door with a new Sears cassette recorder, asking for an interview. Forty-two years later, a somewhat older Alan Freed has posted a link to that 10-minute interview as a memorial. Pete Seeger died Monday at the age of 94.

Alan Freed’s interview with Pete Seeger

Alan Freed’s Facebook page

Postcard and audio © Alan Freed, photo © Amy Winters Galberth, Ellie Borkon

Operator Sigrid Gellerstadt on Her Last Day at the Switchboard in Cotton, Minnesota, 1975

Hard to believe, but during the early 1970s there were still some places in Minnesota where you needed an operator to place a phone call. On January 18, 1975, the telephone exchange in Cotton, about 35 miles north of Duluth, switched to an automatic dial system, making it the last exchange in Minnesota to abandon hand-cranked magneto telephones.

Photo via Minnesota Historical Society High-res

Operator Sigrid Gellerstadt on Her Last Day at the Switchboard in Cotton, Minnesota, 1975

Hard to believe, but during the early 1970s there were still some places in Minnesota where you needed an operator to place a phone call. On January 18, 1975, the telephone exchange in Cotton, about 35 miles north of Duluth, switched to an automatic dial system, making it the last exchange in Minnesota to abandon hand-cranked magneto telephones.

Photo via Minnesota Historical Society

"Co-op War" Factions Face Off Outside Mill City Foods, Minneapolis, 1976
Tensions between two competing factions in the Twin Cities food cooperative movement turned violent on January 9, 1976, when several members of the “Co-op Organization,” or “CO,” assaulted two workers at Minneapolis’s Seward Community Co-op. The CO was a group of politically-motivated activists dedicated to serving the interests of the working class. Opposing them were the more loosely organized “whole foods” folks who wanted to provide healthful and socially-responsible alternatives to the big grocery stores. The take-over at Seward was brief and helped galvanize opposition to the CO and its methods. By the end of the decade, it was clear that “hippy,” whole food types had defeated the “Marxists” in what are now known as the Twin Cities co-op wars.
Photo via Minnesota Historical Society
P.S. We’re giving away 10 signed copies of Minnesota in the 70s at Goodreads! High-res

"Co-op War" Factions Face Off Outside Mill City Foods, Minneapolis, 1976

Tensions between two competing factions in the Twin Cities food cooperative movement turned violent on January 9, 1976, when several members of the “Co-op Organization,” or “CO,” assaulted two workers at Minneapolis’s Seward Community Co-op. The CO was a group of politically-motivated activists dedicated to serving the interests of the working class. Opposing them were the more loosely organized “whole foods” folks who wanted to provide healthful and socially-responsible alternatives to the big grocery stores. The take-over at Seward was brief and helped galvanize opposition to the CO and its methods. By the end of the decade, it was clear that “hippy,” whole food types had defeated the “Marxists” in what are now known as the Twin Cities co-op wars.

Photo via Minnesota Historical Society

P.S. We’re giving away 10 signed copies of Minnesota in the 70s at Goodreads!